Thursday, June 8, 2017

The Song of Creation


THE SONG OF CREATION
To Gerard Manley Hopkins

Creation sings of the glory of God.
We do not hear it but see it
In brilliant interstices
Opening and closing
Of trees waving to and fro
When the world is radiant,
In glittering leaves,
Beaming stones,
Mountain streams, flashing
Metal foil flattened
By fists, smoothed
By hands.

The blind hear the song in the trees yearning to speak.
They inhale it in the attenuated wind,
Taste it in fruits bursting with water.
Bending down to touch the earth,
They become one with the beginning of all things,
Pushing roots into the soil,
Unfolding leaves,
Joining hands with the sun and the dead
Brought back to life.



Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889)

2 comments:

  1. “The Song of Creation” was originally published in Blue Heron Review, Issue 3 (Winter 2015).

    Photo is in public domain.

    Gonzalinho

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  2. GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS AND GOD’S GRANDEUR

    God’s Grandeur is a finely crafted sonnet written in 1877, the year Hopkins was ordained as a Jesuit priest. It explores the relationship between God and the world of nature, how the divine is infused in things and refreshes, despite the efforts of humans to ruin the whole show.

    With the industrial and commercial revolutions gathering pace in Britain and the West, unprecedented pressures were being placed on the environment. Hopkins, a sensitive and observant poet above all else, expressed his dismay at this free-for-all by writing sonnets of extraordinary texture and depth.

    God’s Grandeur is a tour de force, tight-knit yet organic in rhythm and internal rhyme. Hopkins was a fastidious and serious poet, working his lines again and again to achieve the desired effect.

    Link: https://letterpile.com/poetry/Analysis-of-Poem-Gods-Grandeur-by-Gerard-Manley-Hopkins

    Gonzalinho

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